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[27 Apr 2014 | 3 Comments | 205 views]
Malaysian #Bersih movement on Twitter

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I just finished the first article based on my study of the electoral reform movement in Malaysia, Bersih and still trying to write the next one based on the same study. Combining computational mapping[1] and online-offline ethnography,[2] my study examines and contextualize the role(s) of the internet and social media in the movement as being embedded in the contour of societal changes and transformations.
The article itself, perhaps will not be out until next year, but I’m happy to provide you with a little sneak peek (only on Twitter section).
Enjoy!
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an excerpt of …

featured, publication, research & teaching »

[4 Apr 2012 | 14 Comments | 1,935 views]
[Publication] Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004–2011

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My article on social media and 2011 Egypt revolt has been published. It is published as:
Lim, M. (2012), Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004–2011. Journal of Communication, 62: 231–248. doi: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01628.x

Due to copyright issue, however, I cannot share the published version for download from my own server, you thus should download from its original source.

For those who’re interested to read but don’t have access to the journal, I can email you the file. Just post me  your email address (send to my email or leave …

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[28 Feb 2011 | 6 Comments | 17,451 views]
[Research note] Revolution 2.0?

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This is not an in-depth analysis. Just a rant for now.
The day Mubarak fell, NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel Tweeted the photo below, telling the world about an Egyptian protester holding a sign that said, “Thank you, Facebook.” The photo has been viral since then and has become a powerful symbol prompting the causal-effect of social media for democracy.