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[17 Sep 2013 | 6 Comments | 384 views]
[Lim's publication] Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

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Please find below the newly published article on the 2010-2011 Tunisian uprising.
http://JOU.sagepub.com/content/14/7/921

Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

by Merlyna Lim, Arizona State University
cited as:  Lim, M. (2013)  Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising, Journalism: Theory, Praxis, and Criticism,  14(7): 921-941, doi:10.1177/1464884913478359
Abstract
By delving into the detailed account of the Tunisian uprising, this article offers an explanation that sets the 2010 uprising apart from its precursors. The 2010 uprising was successful because activists successfully managed to bridge geographical and class …

presentation/lecture/talk »

[25 May 2012 | 2 Comments | 924 views]
[Presentation] Framing Tunisian Revolt

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Please find below the slideshow of my presentation at the International Communication Association conference in Phoenix, May 26th, 2012.
I realize that the slideshow itself is very visual and has very little explanation, so it’s impossible to understand/know what I was talking about by just looking at it.
I’ll share the content of my presentation later once  once the paper is published.
To summarize, the paper explores and analyzes the significance of contemporary media ecology (includes big and small media, old and new, mainstream & ‘social’ media, national-transnational-global media) in to the establishment …

commentaries, politics, research & teaching, technology »

[28 Feb 2011 | 6 Comments | 17,453 views]
[Research note] Revolution 2.0?

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This is not an in-depth analysis. Just a rant for now.
The day Mubarak fell, NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel Tweeted the photo below, telling the world about an Egyptian protester holding a sign that said, “Thank you, Facebook.” The photo has been viral since then and has become a powerful symbol prompting the causal-effect of social media for democracy.