Tag Archives: tunisia

[Lim’s lecture] Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong

On November 6th, 2014, I delivered the Canada Research Chair public inaugural lecture entitled: “Roots, Routes & Routers: Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong”.

I managed to merge the actual recording of my lecture and the slideshow I prepared for and had shown during the lecture. So, here it is (the prezi is accessible through this link, but it’s also embedded below). Click “start prezi” button and then click the  button on the left corner to listen to the audio.

Unlike this light 10 minutes speech of mine, this one is based on years of comprehensive research and rather long.

Continue reading [Lim’s lecture] Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong

[Lim’s publication] Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

Please find below the newly published article on the 2010-2011 Tunisian uprising.

Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

by Merlyna Lim, Arizona State University

cited as:  Lim, M. (2013)  Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising, Journalism: Theory, Praxis, and Criticism,  14(7): 921-941, doi:10.1177/1464884913478359
Abstract

By delving into the detailed account of the Tunisian uprising, this article offers an explanation that sets the 2010 uprising apart from its precursors. The 2010 uprising was successful because activists successfully managed to bridge geographical and class divides as well as to converge offline and online activisms. Such connection and convergence were made possible, first, through the availability of dramatic visual evidence that turned a local incident into a spectacle. Second, by successful frame alignment with a master narrative that culturally and politically resonated with the entire population. Third, by activating a hybrid network made of the connective structures to facilitate collective action – among Tunisians who shared collective identities and collective frames – and connective action – among individuals who sought more personalized paths to contribute to the movement through digital media.

 

Full text is available here: http://JOU.sagepub.com/content/14/7/921.full.pdf+html

or for those who have no access via university library, the pdf copy is here.

[Presentation] Framing Tunisian Revolt

Please find below the slideshow of my presentation at the International Communication Association conference in Phoenix, May 26th, 2012.

I realize that the slideshow itself is very visual and has very little explanation, so it’s impossible to understand/know what I was talking about by just looking at it.

I’ll share the content of my presentation later once  once the paper is published.

To summarize, the paper explores and analyzes the significance of contemporary media ecology (includes big and small media, old and new, mainstream & ‘social’ media, national-transnational-global media) in to the establishment of social movement (Arab uprisings in general, Tunis revolt in particular).  New practices of media activism –‘networked participatory journalism’ — had facilitated the engagement and participation of diverse publics, contributing to the widening of political opportunities and the capacity to solve/deal with political constrains. Such participatory journalism assisted activists in expanding the networks,  diffusing the  contention, and mobilizing larger audience. Particular attention is given to the role of framing (narrative and identity) and how this contributed to the successful mobilization.

[Research note] Revolution 2.0?

This is not an in-depth analysis. Just a rant for now.

The day Mubarak fell, NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel Tweeted the photo below, telling the world about an Egyptian protester holding a sign that said, “Thank you, Facebook.” The photo has been viral since then and has become a powerful symbol prompting the causal-effect of social media for democracy.

Continue reading [Research note] Revolution 2.0?