Tag Archives: facebook

[Lim’s publication] Many Clicks but Little Sticks: Social Media Activism in Indonesia

I would like to share my newly published article:

Lim, M. 2013, Many Clicks but Little Sticks: Social Media Activism in Indonesia, Journal of Contemporary Asia, DOI:10.1080/00472336.2013.769386

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00472336.2013.769386

Drawing on empirical cases from Indonesia, this article offers a critical approach to the promise of social media activism by analysing the complexity and dynamics of the relationship between social media and its users. Rather than viewing social media activism as the harbinger of social change or dismissing it as mere “slacktivism,” the article provides a more nuanced argument by identifying the conditions under which participation in social media might lead to successful political activism. In social media, networks are vast, content is overly abundant, attention spans are short, and conversations are parsed into diminutive sentences. For social media activism to be translated into populist political activism, it needs to embrace the principles of the contemporary culture of consumption: light package, headline appetite and trailer vision. Social media activism is more likely to successfully mobilise mass support when its narratives are simple, associated with low risk actions and congruent with dominant meta-narratives, such as nationalism and religiosity. Success is less likely when the narrative is contested by dominant competing narratives generated in mainstream media.

Interested to read a full version of the article?

For those who have access from the university library, please download here (I share it online in my website but I also would like to push Taylor & Francis to give free access — if my article has a very high readership it’s more likely they’ll give free access).

For those who are not affiliated with any university, please download here for a free e-print.

 

[Publication] Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004–2011

My article on social media and 2011 Egypt revolt has been published. It is published as:
Due to copyright issue, however, I cannot share the published version for download from my own server, you thus should download from its original source.
For those who’re interested to read but don’t have access to the journal, I can email you the file. Just post me  your email address (send to my email or leave your address in the comment box below).
Thank you.

Abstract:

To deepen our understanding of the relationship between social media and political change during the Egyptian uprising of early 2011, events in Tahrir Square must be situated in a larger context of media use and recent history of online activism. For several years, the most successful social movements in Egypt, including Kefaya, the April 6th Youth, and We are all Khaled Said, were those using social media to expand networks of disaffected Egyptians, broker relations between activists, and globalize the resources and reach of opposition leaders. Social media afforded these opposition leaders the means to shape repertoires of contention, frame the issues, propagate unifying symbols, and transform online activism into offline protests. Continue reading

[Research note] Revolution 2.0?

This is not an in-depth analysis. Just a rant for now.

The day Mubarak fell, NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel Tweeted the photo below, telling the world about an Egyptian protester holding a sign that said, “Thank you, Facebook.” The photo has been viral since then and has become a powerful symbol prompting the causal-effect of social media for democracy.

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Traveling, be back, and more (twisted fb) status

Hello there,

I know I know, my bad…. don’t remind me that it’s been ages since my last entry. Oh well, my last three months have been quite a journey — literally! Yes, 58 days out of town (out of country), traveling in more than 20 cities, mostly in Europe, and then came back to Tempe just to find myself staring at the piles of things to be done (and it doesn’t help that after a week I still am a lazy bone!).

Traveling is, as always, a great experience and this time it’s particularly wonderful. It’s one of the greatest trips I have. And I do look forward to have more and greater ones! Traveling might not change someone to be a better person, but at least encountering various cultures, languages, customs that are different that yours is an enriching experience that (consciously/unconsciously) influences your mindset (positively).
Continue reading