Tag Archives: activism

[Lim’s lecture] Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong

On November 6th, 2014, I delivered the Canada Research Chair public inaugural lecture entitled: “Roots, Routes & Routers: Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong”.

I managed to merge the actual recording of my lecture and the slideshow I prepared for and had shown during the lecture. So, here it is (the prezi is accessible through this link, but it’s also embedded below). Click “start prezi” button and then click the  button on the left corner to listen to the audio.

Unlike this light 10 minutes speech of mine, this one is based on years of comprehensive research and rather long.

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[Publication] Seeing Spatially: People, Networks and Movements in Digital and Urban Spaces

A special issue on “Insurgencies, social media and the public city in Asia” (January 2014) from the International Development Planning Review is just out. It features six fascinating articles from Douglass (on insurgencies & public city in East and Southeast Asia), Padawangi (on Jakarta’s grassroot movement), Pandi (on Hindraf movement), Weiss (on new media activism in Southeast Asia), Zhang & Nyiri (on ‘walled’ activism in China), and myself (on theorization/conceptualization of online-offline spaces in social movement); with an intro from Douglass, Padawangi, & Marolt.

http://liverpool.metapress.com/content/nm6625537411/?p=2ee7a80424bc41f497b8b4a80cce66f0&pi=0

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[Lim’s publication] Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

Please find below the newly published article on the 2010-2011 Tunisian uprising.

Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

by Merlyna Lim, Arizona State University

cited as:  Lim, M. (2013)  Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising, Journalism: Theory, Praxis, and Criticism,  14(7): 921-941, doi:10.1177/1464884913478359
Abstract

By delving into the detailed account of the Tunisian uprising, this article offers an explanation that sets the 2010 uprising apart from its precursors. The 2010 uprising was successful because activists successfully managed to bridge geographical and class divides as well as to converge offline and online activisms. Such connection and convergence were made possible, first, through the availability of dramatic visual evidence that turned a local incident into a spectacle. Second, by successful frame alignment with a master narrative that culturally and politically resonated with the entire population. Third, by activating a hybrid network made of the connective structures to facilitate collective action – among Tunisians who shared collective identities and collective frames – and connective action – among individuals who sought more personalized paths to contribute to the movement through digital media.

 

Full text is available here: http://JOU.sagepub.com/content/14/7/921.full.pdf+html

or for those who have no access via university library, the pdf copy is here.

[Presentation] Framing Tunisian Revolt

Please find below the slideshow of my presentation at the International Communication Association conference in Phoenix, May 26th, 2012.

I realize that the slideshow itself is very visual and has very little explanation, so it’s impossible to understand/know what I was talking about by just looking at it.

I’ll share the content of my presentation later once  once the paper is published.

To summarize, the paper explores and analyzes the significance of contemporary media ecology (includes big and small media, old and new, mainstream & ‘social’ media, national-transnational-global media) in to the establishment of social movement (Arab uprisings in general, Tunis revolt in particular).  New practices of media activism –‘networked participatory journalism’ — had facilitated the engagement and participation of diverse publics, contributing to the widening of political opportunities and the capacity to solve/deal with political constrains. Such participatory journalism assisted activists in expanding the networks,  diffusing the  contention, and mobilizing larger audience. Particular attention is given to the role of framing (narrative and identity) and how this contributed to the successful mobilization.

[Publication] Clicks, Cabs, and Coffee Houses: Social Media and Oppositional Movements in Egypt, 2004–2011

My article on social media and 2011 Egypt revolt has been published. It is published as:
Due to copyright issue, however, I cannot share the published version for download from my own server, you thus should download from its original source.
For those who’re interested to read but don’t have access to the journal, I can email you the file. Just post me  your email address (send to my email or leave your address in the comment box below).
Thank you.

Abstract:

To deepen our understanding of the relationship between social media and political change during the Egyptian uprising of early 2011, events in Tahrir Square must be situated in a larger context of media use and recent history of online activism. For several years, the most successful social movements in Egypt, including Kefaya, the April 6th Youth, and We are all Khaled Said, were those using social media to expand networks of disaffected Egyptians, broker relations between activists, and globalize the resources and reach of opposition leaders. Social media afforded these opposition leaders the means to shape repertoires of contention, frame the issues, propagate unifying symbols, and transform online activism into offline protests. Continue reading

[Publication] Finding Her Master’s Voice

Since end of 2007/early 2008 I’ve been interested in the Middle East online sphere and found that women activists are in the frontier of socio-political activism in the region. I managed to convince two colleagues of mine to collaborate  with me in conducting a preliminary research on one of the movement, Al-Huwaider Campaign. We wrote this piece back in mid 2010 and it’s out for publication (in computer science/information science field) this month. This is just a “preview” of a deeper-broader longitudinal research that we will conduct from August 2011 to August 2014, and serve mostly as a methodological foundation (to be developed, tested, and advanced).

Not my usual type of publication, but I think it’s good to experiment with new ways of doing. In the meantime, I hope to continue working on my own solo publications, too.

Here is an abstract of the article. We hope to come up with more analysis on female (Muslim) online activism in the future.

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