Category Archives: research & teaching

[Publication] A CyberUrban Space Odyssey

Just published: Lim, M. (2015) A CyberUrban Space Odyssey: The Spatiality of Contemporary Social Movements, New Geographies 07:117-123.
Feel free to download for your perusal from this link:
https://www.academia.edu/…/Lim_M._2015._A_CyberUrban_Space_…

This article is part of the newest issue of New Geographies. It  scrutinizes the complex entanglement of cyberurban spaces in the making and development of contemporary social movement by analyzing its imaginaries, practices, and trajectories.

NEW GEOGRAPHIES: GEOGRAPHIES OF INFORMATION Continue reading [Publication] A CyberUrban Space Odyssey

[Book] Digital Activism in Asia Reader

The Centre for Internet and Society has just published a reader entitled “Digital Activism in Asia”. Edited by Shah, Sneha, and Chattapadhyay, the reader  combines stories in multiple forms, including academic essays (one of them is mine), case-studies to grey literature that reveals and points to the debates around digital activism that have emerged in this particular context.  The reader “attempts a crowd-sourced compilation that presents critical tools, organisations, theoretical concepts, political analyses, illustrative case-studies and annotations, that an emerging network of changemakers in Asia have identified as important in their own practices within their own contexts.” Continue reading [Book] Digital Activism in Asia Reader

[TIPS] Handling Q&A session

My graduate students asked for some tips to handle conference’ Q&A session. Here are my answers. I find these useful not only for conferences, but also in everyday interactions.

1. When you think you really know the answer, wait 5 seconds before you say it. Sometimes you don’t really know whether you really know or just think you really know.
2. Avoid a ‘stupid’ moment: before reacting (negatively/harshly/carelessly/…), think of something stupid and don’t say it. Continue reading [TIPS] Handling Q&A session

Publishing in academia (2): Co-authorship

Academic articles (also, to a certain degree, books and monographs), especially in science & engineering, frequently are published by multiple authors. Co-authorship has also become more common in social sciences and even in humanities which historically adopted a single-author tradition.

Is there any rule/regulation regarding the co-authorship? If so, what are the rules?

The practices of co-authorship  usually depend on the fields, disciplines, countries, and institutions. But, yes, there are actually rules in place!  Continue reading Publishing in academia (2): Co-authorship

Publishing in academia (1): Basic information

This is a slideshow I made to share some very very basic information about publishing a journal article for graduate students who never published before.https://prezi.com/2wekrbuldmkw/publishing-a-journal-article/

Feel free to share this to those who may need it.

This is the first in the series. Will try to get the next slideshow done soon. Continue reading Publishing in academia (1): Basic information

[Lim’s lecture] Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong

On November 6th, 2014, I delivered the Canada Research Chair public inaugural lecture entitled: “Roots, Routes & Routers: Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong”.

I managed to merge the actual recording of my lecture and the slideshow I prepared for and had shown during the lecture. So, here it is (the prezi is accessible through this link, but it’s also embedded below). Click “start prezi” button and then click the  button on the left corner to listen to the audio.

Unlike this light 10 minutes speech of mine, this one is based on years of comprehensive research and rather long.

Continue reading [Lim’s lecture] Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong

[Publication] Seeing Spatially: People, Networks and Movements in Digital and Urban Spaces

A special issue on “Insurgencies, social media and the public city in Asia” (January 2014) from the International Development Planning Review is just out. It features six fascinating articles from Douglass (on insurgencies & public city in East and Southeast Asia), Padawangi (on Jakarta’s grassroot movement), Pandi (on Hindraf movement), Weiss (on new media activism in Southeast Asia), Zhang & Nyiri (on ‘walled’ activism in China), and myself (on theorization/conceptualization of online-offline spaces in social movement); with an intro from Douglass, Padawangi, & Marolt.

http://liverpool.metapress.com/content/nm6625537411/?p=2ee7a80424bc41f497b8b4a80cce66f0&pi=0

Continue reading [Publication] Seeing Spatially: People, Networks and Movements in Digital and Urban Spaces

[Lim’s publication] Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

Please find below the newly published article on the 2010-2011 Tunisian uprising.

Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

by Merlyna Lim, Arizona State University

cited as:  Lim, M. (2013)  Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising, Journalism: Theory, Praxis, and Criticism,  14(7): 921-941, doi:10.1177/1464884913478359
Abstract

By delving into the detailed account of the Tunisian uprising, this article offers an explanation that sets the 2010 uprising apart from its precursors. The 2010 uprising was successful because activists successfully managed to bridge geographical and class divides as well as to converge offline and online activisms. Such connection and convergence were made possible, first, through the availability of dramatic visual evidence that turned a local incident into a spectacle. Second, by successful frame alignment with a master narrative that culturally and politically resonated with the entire population. Third, by activating a hybrid network made of the connective structures to facilitate collective action – among Tunisians who shared collective identities and collective frames – and connective action – among individuals who sought more personalized paths to contribute to the movement through digital media.

 

Full text is available here: http://JOU.sagepub.com/content/14/7/921.full.pdf+html

or for those who have no access via university library, the pdf copy is here.