Category Archives: research & teaching

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Publishing in academia (2): Co-authorship

Academic articles (also, to a certain degree, books and monographs), especially in science & engineering, frequently are published by multiple authors. Co-authorship has also become more common in social sciences and even in humanities which historically adopted a single-author tradition.

Is there any rule/regulation regarding the co-authorship? If so, what are the rules?

The practices of co-authorship  usually depend on the fields, disciplines, countries, and institutions. But, yes, there are actually rules in place!  Continue reading

Publishing in academia (1): Basic information

This is a slideshow I made to share some very very basic information about publishing a journal article for graduate students who never published before.https://prezi.com/2wekrbuldmkw/publishing-a-journal-article/

Feel free to share this to those who may need it.

This is the first in the series. Will try to get the next slideshow done soon. Continue reading

[Lim’s lecture] Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong

On November 6th, 2014, I delivered the Canada Research Chair public inaugural lecture entitled: “Roots, Routes & Routers: Social Media and Urban Activism from the Arab Spring to Hong Kong”.

I managed to merge the actual recording of my lecture and the slideshow I prepared for and had shown during the lecture. So, here it is (the prezi is accessible through this link, but it’s also embedded below). Click “start prezi” button and then click the  button on the left corner to listen to the audio.

Unlike this light 10 minutes speech of mine, this one is based on years of comprehensive research and rather long.

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[Publication] Seeing Spatially: People, Networks and Movements in Digital and Urban Spaces

A special issue on “Insurgencies, social media and the public city in Asia” (January 2014) from the International Development Planning Review is just out. It features six fascinating articles from Douglass (on insurgencies & public city in East and Southeast Asia), Padawangi (on Jakarta’s grassroot movement), Pandi (on Hindraf movement), Weiss (on new media activism in Southeast Asia), Zhang & Nyiri (on ‘walled’ activism in China), and myself (on theorization/conceptualization of online-offline spaces in social movement); with an intro from Douglass, Padawangi, & Marolt.

http://liverpool.metapress.com/content/nm6625537411/?p=2ee7a80424bc41f497b8b4a80cce66f0&pi=0

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[Lim’s publication] Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

Please find below the newly published article on the 2010-2011 Tunisian uprising.

Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising

by Merlyna Lim, Arizona State University

cited as:  Lim, M. (2013)  Framing Bouazizi: ‘White lies’, hybrid network, and collective/connective action in the 2010–11 Tunisian uprising, Journalism: Theory, Praxis, and Criticism,  14(7): 921-941, doi:10.1177/1464884913478359
Abstract

By delving into the detailed account of the Tunisian uprising, this article offers an explanation that sets the 2010 uprising apart from its precursors. The 2010 uprising was successful because activists successfully managed to bridge geographical and class divides as well as to converge offline and online activisms. Such connection and convergence were made possible, first, through the availability of dramatic visual evidence that turned a local incident into a spectacle. Second, by successful frame alignment with a master narrative that culturally and politically resonated with the entire population. Third, by activating a hybrid network made of the connective structures to facilitate collective action – among Tunisians who shared collective identities and collective frames – and connective action – among individuals who sought more personalized paths to contribute to the movement through digital media.

 

Full text is available here: http://JOU.sagepub.com/content/14/7/921.full.pdf+html

or for those who have no access via university library, the pdf copy is here.

[Lim’s publication] Many Clicks but Little Sticks: Social Media Activism in Indonesia

I would like to share my newly published article:

Lim, M. 2013, Many Clicks but Little Sticks: Social Media Activism in Indonesia, Journal of Contemporary Asia, DOI:10.1080/00472336.2013.769386

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00472336.2013.769386

Drawing on empirical cases from Indonesia, this article offers a critical approach to the promise of social media activism by analysing the complexity and dynamics of the relationship between social media and its users. Rather than viewing social media activism as the harbinger of social change or dismissing it as mere “slacktivism,” the article provides a more nuanced argument by identifying the conditions under which participation in social media might lead to successful political activism. In social media, networks are vast, content is overly abundant, attention spans are short, and conversations are parsed into diminutive sentences. For social media activism to be translated into populist political activism, it needs to embrace the principles of the contemporary culture of consumption: light package, headline appetite and trailer vision. Social media activism is more likely to successfully mobilise mass support when its narratives are simple, associated with low risk actions and congruent with dominant meta-narratives, such as nationalism and religiosity. Success is less likely when the narrative is contested by dominant competing narratives generated in mainstream media.

Interested to read a full version of the article?

For those who have access from the university library, please download here (I share it online in my website but I also would like to push Taylor & Francis to give free access — if my article has a very high readership it’s more likely they’ll give free access).

For those who are not affiliated with any university, please download here for a free e-print.

 

Celebration of Diversity and Multiculturalism

‎”What makes America exceptional are the bonds that hold together the most diverse nation on earth. The belief that our destiny is shared; that this country only works when we accept certain obligations to one another and to future generations. The freedom which so many Americans have fought for and died for come with responsibilities as well as rights. And among those are love and charity and duty and patriotism. That’s what makes America great” (Obama, 7 Nov 2012).

Beyond the election itself, echoing Howard Fineman, I agree that today’s result “signaled the irreversible triumph of a new, 21st-century America: multiracial, multi-ethnic, global in outlook and moving beyond centuries of racial, sexual, marital and religious tradition.Continue reading

[Publication] Life Is Local in the Imagined Global Community

“… In grappling with multiple identities and multiple realities, the reality of everyday life is experienced as reality par excellence.  Micro narratives that are closer to the everyday life experience are embraced more openly, resulting in the plurality of voices, allowing for differences, nuances, and even counter-hegemonic voices. The closer to home the issue resonates, the more conversations take place. Life is local, even in the global blogosphere.” Continue reading